For marketers, we are living in a social media nightmare. At first, we thought it was easier to connect with people, then we realized with so much competition in the market, our knowledge is being tested, and it is very hard to get the right mix.
Someone recently ask me… “how do you tell what kind of voice you use for each social media platform?”

The question really got me thinking. Each platform has a specific personality.  All postings should be based on your audience, but you have to think about how they want to hear your valuable information. Do they want to read an extensive study? Would they prefer a humorous anecdote. What are they looking for? An easy way to make that decision is: What kind of attire is your audience wearing when they read your post?”
Mar 03, 2016

I agree with this 100%. When I first started Marketing Eye, I built it from a perspective that there was no global player in SMB marketing. While this makes perfect sense, it didn't reach the pit of what I really wanted to achieve as a business person, or a leader for that matter. I also had not thought it through.

"I was doing something from a very real, a very honest place, so I think that's why I was able to build an audience," said Gwyneth Paltrow to Fast Company in an interview which I have recently seen on Facebook. 

Through social media you can now forge a very lucrative career, particularly as it becomes a unique arm of a company’s communications department.

They are many companies that will now pay six figures for the right social media person, but how do you build and maximise your expertise? 
Blogging is at times difficult, but creating a strong social media following for your blog can be even more difficult. Here are eight tips that will help make your blog stand out. 

What comes first the blog or the social media following? This is dependent on the individual. For example, some individuals already have a strong online presence through their social media accounts. They might already have a large following on their Instagram posting about lifestyle, and want to take it that next step further. They then create a blog geared towards lifestyle, so they are able to write more in depth posts.

The lines blurred sometime in the last 10 years, but I don't know exactly when it happened.


Having started my first business at 25 years of age, specializing in technology marketing, I thought I had it all. A marketer who understood technology marketing and who could talk the talk which at that time seemed to be, the height of the dot com boom, the most lucrative marketing position one could hold.


Then of course, someone came along and started talking about company culture, and marketers took a turn to start embellishing the on-boarding process of new recruits, with a mixture of "people marketing" with "technology marketing" - and for a time, that was all the rage. It seemed to be the only thing people were talking about and marketers starting play a role in human resources, giving recruiters and in-house HR managers the tools to "sell their brands" like they were a front line sales executive needing to close the deal in order to reach their quotas.

Who would have thought that a blog titled "Why married women are more successful" would receive 54,256 views in less than 24 hours, 555 likes, 634 comments, 702 Facebook likes, 2,632 shares on LinkedIn and 79 retweets on Twitter? I did. And that's exactly why I wrote it.

I am a new author on LinkedIn and I know a thing or two about blogging and going viral. If I just write about marketing, at most, I will get between 1,000 and 10,000 views over a week. If I write about something personal - more. But if I write about something that people have strong opinions on or that hits a raw nerve - the sky is literally the limit.

It also depends on the forum. The very same post "Why married women are more successful" was posted on this blog last week, with less than 1,000 unique views. The reason for this, as I explained to my team, was because people who read my blog are highly educated, entrepreneurs or CEO's, who 'get the value of a good blog'. They wouldn't respond because just by reading "kiss as many boys as they like" they realize that it is very "Sex in the City" rather than an article that is going to be backed up with a statistical line up.

It feels like the birth of the sweeping social media phenomenon occurred just five seconds ago, with Pinterest’s viral growth to dizzying heights, Facebook’s takeover of Instagram and Twitter launching the new network, Vine.

The new medium is continuing to grow and evolve, spawning a new phenomenon of its own: visual social media.

Like moths to a flame, humans are innately drawn to visual elements including images, photographs and sensational design. As more of us are increasingly mobile and engaging with social media on smartphones, viewing an image is far less tedious than squinting to read a few lines of tiny text on a moving train.
Feb 12, 2013

Let’s start this blog with a simple exercise. Go to your Facebook page and look at the last 10 statuses you posted. What are they mostly about? You may want to think before posting if most of your statuses revolve around work complaints, drunken weekend antics or overstate political opinions.

A study by University of Scranton and UC San Diego researchers found that Facebook status updates stick in the minds of readers for longer than you think – one status alone is 1.5 times more memorable than sentences from books, and 2.5 times more memorable than faces of strangers, representing a remarkable difference in memory performance.
The vast majority of business owners eat, breathe and sleep work.  You know your product.  You know your industry.  You have great relationships with your clients; even prospective business; BUT business isn’t as boom-boom-boom as it could be.  
Insert question marks here…  Sometimes even the odd exclamation mark for frustration’s sake.

You spend all your time on your business, client relationships, communications.  You’re investing a lot in your marketing to spread awareness and build a reputation.  Where’s the conversion?  Where’s the new business?  Where’s the Twitter following?  Where are the likes on Facebook?

Know.  Like.  Trust.

No matter how big and experienced you may be, a lot of people don’t know about the X-Factor of communication - that recent Chanel ad featuring Brad Pitt is a great example (making it to the ‘Business Insider’s 10 Worst Ads of 2012’ list).  Before you sell anything, you need to get known, you need to be liked and you need to be trusted.

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